Get Energized for Renewables in 2019!

Posted by Content Director on May 14, 2019 4:17:45 PM

In 2018, the California legislature passed several laws that encourage the sustained use of renewable energy sources. Most pertinent to property owners is Senator Scott Wiener’s SB 700, which extends the state’s Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) to 2024 and expands the beloved rebate program to include up to $800 million for energy storage equipment. “SGIP supports the deployment of solar, wind turbines, microturbines, fuel cells, energy storage and other distributed energy technologies by utility customers,” according to an article on the bill’s passage in Energy Storage News.

Get Energized for Renewables in 2019!

In 2018, the California legislature passed several laws that encourage the sustained use of renewable energy sources. Most pertinent to property owners is Senator Scott Wiener’s SB 700, which extends the state’s Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) to 2024 and expands the beloved rebate program to include up to $800 million for energy storage equipment. “SGIP supports the deployment of solar, wind turbines, microturbines, fuel cells, energy storage and other distributed energy technologies by utility customers,” according to an article on the bill’s passage in Energy Storage News.

Wiener noted that, “If we are going to get to 100% clean energy, we need to be using solar power every hour of the day, not just when the sun is shining”—an allusion to the other big renewable energy bill of 2018: SB 100. This bill requires the state to get all of its electricity from renewable and zero-emissions resources by 2045. It also mandates that the state get 60 percent of its electricity from renewables by 2030.

With this newly expanded incentive program and growing demand from the state, 2019 might be your year to finally make that dream solar system a reality.

Smart Saver Tip of the Month

Have older toilets that waste water with every flush? A simple, inexpensive answer could be in your recycling bin. According to bobvila.com, just take two empty plastic soda bottles and put an inch or so of sand inside to weigh them down. Fill the bottles with water, screw on the caps and put them inside the toilet tank. (Make sure they aren’t near any moving parts.) Now when the tank refills, it won’t need as much water to raise the toilet float.

 

Come save with us!